OWANECO-CAMPBELLSBURG DEPOT

 

The depot was formerly located in Campbellsburg, in Buckhart Township, in Christian County; at the intersection of county road 625E – 2300N Road and Illinois Route 29.  The B&O obtained a charter for the railroad in 1865 and completed the line in 1870.

 

Campbellsburg was named in honor of the Shad J Campbell family and was surveyed and laid off into lots in 1870.  The first house was built by James R Stokes in 1870; Allen Stokes built the first store that same year and also had a blacksmith shop and freight house.  Campbellsburg ceased to exist when two other settlements, known as Blueville and Bluepoint, consolidated to be known as Edinburg.

 

The depot was moved down the B&O Railroad line to the village of Owaneco.  This is half way between Pana and Taylorville; it was an important grain and stock center.  The village was laid out and surveyed on October 1, 1869.  It gave excellent service to the patrons with trains daily each way.  The stations were Edinburg, Sharpsburg, Taylorville, Velma, Owaneco, Millersville, and Pana.  The first train entered Taylorville at 5 pm on October 25, 1869.  The first through train from Beardstown to Shawneetown was run on this line on March 28, 1872.  The Owaneco Post Office was established in 1857.

 

The Christian County Historical Society Museum acquired the train depot from bankruptcy court for $100.  The depot was moved to the museum grounds in August, 1986.

 

 

ALL ABOARD!

 

The Owaneco/Campbellsburg Depot was first located in Campbellsburg, in Buckhart Township, Christian County; it was completed in 1870.  Campbellsburg ceased to exist when the railroad razed the freight house and moved the depot.

The depot was moved down the B&O Railroad line to the village of Owaneco.  It was acquired in a bankruptcy court for $100.00 and restored through donations of labor and contributions and the membership of the society.

 

The first train entered Taylorville, at 5 pm on October 25, 1869.  The first through train from Beardstown to Shawneetown was run on this line on March 28, 1872.

 

Owaneco residents have great memories of the depot and the train.  Lee Fisher remembers when Dr. Jerry Millhon completed dentistry school and came to set-up his dental office where his father had his medical office.  Lee’s father helped get the dental chair off the train and was Dr. Millhon’s first patient.

 

John Wilhour picked up his 4-H calf at the depot when it arrived in a crate from Wisconsin; he was about 11 years old at the time.  He named her Sweet Heart. He got to ride the train to Beecher City to spend time with his grandparents during the summer.

 

Carroll Law wishes he had all the Indian Head Pennies that he and his friends laid on the tracks to have flattened.  He also got to enjoy trips on the train to visit his grandparents in Lakewood.

 

The residents believe that the Sears home that was known as the Eaton home probably arrived on the train.  Mr. Eaton was the president of the bank, which was located where the post office was located later.  It is the nice stucco home located on the corner of the Main and Grand where the Paul and Jenny Mizeur family lives.

 

The “Puddle Jumper” as they called the one car passenger train ran from Beardstown to Flora, several times each day. They said if you missed it; you could always run to catch it.   There were three tracks at the depot so there could be two trains on the side.  They used Morris Code to contact the train and other depots.   Station operators they remember are John McGuire and Darrell Burrus.

 

There was a train wreck north of Owaneco, in about 1911; Jacob Law and his son were killed.